I am happy to say that a print version of my ebook, The Shadow Twins, should be available this fall! In the meantime, here is a bit about the book and the writer.

    When I was an aspiring writer of seven or so, I wrote a story in which my characters had no clothes. This concerned my teacher, who returned the story to me for correction. Thereupon I provided them with the ability to grow soft blue fur to protect them in cold weather. The teacher was horrified. “Why, this is nothing but science fiction!” she declared. Really? I was hooked.

   

     Science fiction provides anywhere and everywhere, everyone and everything imaginable. Yet somehow I find myself casting a story on familiar ground. There may not be any dogs but there are other creatures, loyal and strong, called bezas. They have woolly russet fur and tend to hog the fireplace. Soon I found that there was much more to the story.

 

     There is a cold and muddy planetoid where the frog-line human settlers don’t need continuously paved roads; they hop easily from one section to the next. There is a free university on the planet Arobi, whose gardens contain plants from everywhere in the galaxy and scented breezes cast blue, double-pointed shadows of the moving leaves.

 

     Perhaps it is very hot and still, and only the Bluewood Mountains offer cool shade. Or a light rain is falling on the vendors’ tents in the back of the city by the harbor. In the dim Frozen Worlds, The ancient Fallut mine the ice and minerals, spreading their wings to glide among the asteroids.

 

     There are lessons, and chores, and traditions adhered to, and two boys who swim secretly at night. There are hidden settlements where the First Ones hide in centuries of isolation since leaving Earth, three thousand years ago. It all begins with the formation of the double planets...

    When I was an aspiring writer of seven or so, I wrote a story in which my characters had no clothes. This concerned my teacher, who returned the story to me for correction. Thereupon I provided them with the ability to grow soft blue fur to protect them in cold weather. The teacher was horrified. “Why, this is nothing but science fiction!” she declared. Really? I was hooked.

     Science fiction provides anywhere and everywhere, everyone and everything imaginable. Yet somehow I find myself casting a story on familiar ground. There may not be any dogs but there are other creatures, loyal and strong, called bezas. They have woolly russet fur and tend to hog the fireplace. Soon I found that there was much more to the story.

 

    There is a cold and muddy planetoid in the Griebus Cluster, where the frog-line human settlers don’t need continuously paved roads; they hop easily from one section to the next. There is a free university on the planet Arobi, whose gardens contain plants from everywhere in the galaxy and scented breezes cast blue, double-pointed shadows of the moving leaves.

 

Perhaps it is very hot and still, and only the Bluewood Mountains offer cool shade. Or a light rain is falling on the vendors’ tents in the back of the city by the harbor. In the dim Frozen Worlds, The ancient Fallut mine the ice and minerals, spreading their wings to glide among the asteroids.

  There are lessons and chores on Stone Planet, and traditions adhered to, and two boys who swim secretly at night. There are hidden settlements where the First Ones hide in centuries of isolation since leaving Earth, three thousand years ago. It all begins with the formation of the double planets...

why I write science fiction